Amanda Jonas

Articles

My Name is Amanda
As I am leaving UB and entering the next phase of my life, I feel like this is the perfect opportunity to admit to a few things and apologize to the appropriate people, because frankly, it's too late now for the university to stop me from graduating, and I could use a little good karma. My freshman year at UB I was walking through the bus loop after an early morning crew practice, and got hit full speed by a car. As I trudged in my grey head-to-toe sweatpants in front of a Stampede bus moments earlier, I glanced over my left shoulder to see a car heading right toward me.
A Shameful Low in Higher Education
If there was a fire in the University at Buffalo's disability testing center, freshman Mark Shaw would not be able to get out. Sophomore Raymond Matuszak can't fit into a regular classroom desk, so he often has to stand or sit in a chair without a desk during class. Junior Alec Frazier often gets shuffled into back rooms and offices to take exams because he needs voice-automated software to help him. Senior Catherine Scharf, who is visually impaired, clings to the walls of UB's staircases, because the signs and staircases are hazardous for those with limited vision. UB is responsible for much of these students' struggles. Eight years ago, the University at Buffalo agreed to make this campus accessible to the roughly 500 disabled students who attend every year.
March Madness
The annual Student Association executive board elections mark, for some students, the most obnoxious time of the year to attend UB. For three consecutive days at the end of March, students steer clear of the Student Union at all costs to escape being bombarded by candidates and campaign supporters.
UB 2020 Progress
The University at Buffalo is one step closer to making UB 2020 a reality. On Wednesday, a bill sponsored by Republican North Buffalo State Senator Mark Grisanti, entitled the "UB 2020 Flexibility and Economic Growth Act," passed through the New York State Senate and was sent on to the Assembly.
Saving SUNY
Student leaders from across the 64 SUNY campuses sent a strong message to Governor Andrew Cuomo on Tuesday in response to his budget for the upcoming year.
Americans Need to Lighten Up
Americans are eating themselves to death, and cable television is inviting us to watch. Not that I am complaining. My roommate and I have about five shows that we regularly record on DVR.
Pay it Forward
Volunteerism, service and community engagement may not be words typically associated with a college student's idea of a "spring break." However, for those looking for an out-of-the-ordinary experience, the Center for Student Leadership & Community Engagement (CSLCE) is giving students the chance to make a difference this spring break. According to Tim Leonard, a graduate assistant for community involvement, the CSLCE is offering interested students the opportunity to volunteer locally in the Buffalo area or in post-Katrina New Orleans. For those interested in staying in Buffalo, "Alternative Spring Break: Give Where You Live" allows 20 students the chance to explore the Western New York area while serving the local community. "We think it's a unique opportunity for students to get to know the town that they live in," Leonard said.
Academic Dishonesty Continues in the Management Department
As the spring semester begins, 30 students are facing failing grades on their transcripts for cheating in Professor Ray Orrange's MGQ 301: Statistical Decisions in Management class at the end of last semester. This incident of widespread academic dishonesty is especially concerning to faculty in the School of Management in light of what happened in David Murray's Introduction to Management Info Systems online-based class, MGS 351, last semester. "I have been here 19 years and I have had various episodes of academic dishonesty," said Orrange, adjunct associate professor in the organization and human resources department.
Gone But Not Forgotten
I was homeschooled until high school. Insert a joke about being Amish and/or inbred here. Homeschooling had its perks: lots of cross country trips to Gettysburg and Washington D.C.