The Spectrum encourages UB to help #SaveStudentNewsrooms


The first Spectrum came out in December, 1950. In it, our staff wrote that a campus newspaper must present “all the hues and facets” of important issues at UB. 

We don’t use the term “hues and facets” anymore, but we still have the same mission: to deliver news and information to the UB community. 

Today is Save Student Newsrooms Day, a day when across the country students are advocating for campus news. Local news across the country is in crisis.

The number of newsroom employees has dropped about a quarter nationwide in the past decade, according to Pew Research Center. Pew also reports that about 36% of the largest U.S. newsrooms have experienced layoffs since 2017. Associated Press also reported that about 1,400 U.S. communities have seen their local paper disappear in the last 15 years.

At The Spectrum, in 2016, we shifted from three times a week to twice a week. We’ve been working to increase our online presence because we know that is where and how you want news. 

The news we covers matters.



It’s also not covered by anyone else. 

For instance, we covered the Living Stipend Movement, students’ concerns of decreasing black faculty, racism in UB’s past, UB Athletics’ legendary season and much, much more.

We are the historical record of the UB campus. 

In return, we ask little. 

We just want your support. 

We want you to understand the value of student news and help us do our jobs when we ask. Every day, our reporters work to get facts and information you need to know about our community. 

Recently, this has become more difficult. Often administrators don’t want to talk to us. That makes our job of bringing you quality information harder. 

Save Student Newsrooms Day began as a national movement last year.

Recently, we’ve covered stories of administrators Dennis Black and Andrea Costantino’s shameful conduct in 2017. The two stole and used more than $330,000 of your state money. Both pleaded guilty to grand larceny charges.

Our reporting pushed UB to take down an abandoned and potentially dangerous ropes course outside Sweet Home High School. It received more attention to the Student Association’s decision not to recognize an LGBTQ club. SA changed its stance less than 24 hours after our article. These stories led to campus conversations and change. 

To do this reporting we need you. 

We want to be a forum and a voice for your campus experience.

The Buffalo News no longer has a higher education reporter. We’re often the only journalists writing about campus meetings. We’re often the only ones reporting on trends that affect students, like decreasing participation in student government. We’re at council meetings, campus events and art expos.

We print your opinions, your letters and report on them. We also write about faculty issues, cover their meetings and print their letters. And we stay in touch with our alumni. This issue is dedicated to them. 

The Spectrum began nearly 69 years ago. 

Across decades, people who were involved in the paper describe it as their defining UB experience. 

We are always looking for new staff and encourage anyone interested to join our team of reporters, editors, photographers, videographers and social media editors. 

Hundreds of student writers have walked through our doors when we were on South Campus, in Baldy Hall or right here in the Student Union. 

The Spectrum has mattered since the 1950s. It still matters. It is a fundamental part of UB campus life today. We want it to be that way for the next 69 years, in 2088 and beyond.

Help us help you.

Share our stories, your stories. 

Help us #SaveStudentNewsrooms.

The editorial board can be reached at opinion@ubspectrum.com.