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Wednesday, May 22, 2024
The independent student publication of The University at Buffalo, since 1950

Features

FEATURES

The road to Recovery

Matthew Faulkner will never remember what happened on March 2, 2009. Though the day's events are not stored in his memory, he has a way to replay them on a screen. After being in a traumatic car accident, Faulkner was left in coma for six weeks.


OUTLaw, a UB law school group that sponsors activities, seminars, service projects and social gatherings for members and supporters of the LGBT community, aims to spread awareness about legal issues pertaining to the LGBT community.
FEATURES

(OUTLaw)ing Discrimination

When Daniel DeVoe arrived at UB in the fall of 2011 to attend law school, UB's law school environment had no opportunities for an LGBT student or anyone interested in LGBT law. Instead of wishing he had chosen a school with a thriving LGBT community, DeVoe did something about it.


FEATURES

Cracking the code

The next Mark Zuckerberg or Bill Gates could be at UB. The SUNY Buffalo chapter of UB ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery, is one of two computer science and engineering clubs that the university has to offer its undergraduate students.


The Catholic Newman Center on North Campus will hold several services for Easter weekend that students who can't go home for Easter can attend. There will be a washing of feet and mass on Holy Thursday, a "solemn service" on Good Friday, mass on Holy Saturday and sunrise mass held outside on Easter Sunday.
FEATURES

Celebrating Easter on campus

Many UB students are unable to travel home for the Easter weekend since UB does not cancel classes for Good Friday and holds classes the next Monday, making it difficult to allot time for travel. But there are opportunities on campus for students to partake in, including Easter Sunday mass and Good Friday services.


The Spectrum
FEATURES

The perfect location for sexy time

Whether it's after a romantic date, after a night of partying or just because you have that itch that needs to be scratched, sometimes you need to get down and dirty as soon as possible. Unfortunately, this cannot always happen - especially if you live in an on-campus dorm or an apartment - because it's not polite to have sex when your roommate is chowing down on a turkey sandwich on the other side of the room. Obviously when you're not living by yourself, you can't hook up whenever or wherever you want.


FEATURES

Where to live next year: A comprehensive guide

It happens every year. Emails flood the inboxes of students, assuring them living on campus is the best decision or reminding them to hurry up and sign a lease with the Villas. The decision of where to live in the next academic year is something that students stress over for months ahead of time.


Dr. Michael Frisch, a history and American Studies professor, is a Fulbright scholar, a member of The 198 String Band and founder of Randforce Associates, LLC, in UB's Technology Incubator. He has dedicated his passions and talents to UB for over 30 years.
FEATURES

The multifaceted Frisch

Thirty-three years ago, Dr. Michael Frisch was arrested during his first year of teaching. On March 15, 1970, the 26-year-old history professor was part of the "Faculty 45" - a non-violent sit-in of 45 faculty members protesting UB's use of Buffalo police officers on campus. The faculty members sought to discuss a more peaceful approach to student conflicts that were occurring at UB.


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FEATURES

For mature audiences only

Kelly Stone once walked in on her son attempting to insert a tampon into his butt. Her son knew what a tampon was and what it was used for - that it was for his mother's


FEATURES

Librarians: mastering the art of research

After two-and-a-half years of labor and education law, Tiffany Walsh realized it wasn't the career for her. She needed to start over and find her passion. Walsh remembered what an old college professor once told her, "If you know you're not happy [with your profession] then what you should do is just put out a lot of different feelers ... try four or five different avenues and set that out as different options, and then when you get some information back, see which one of those will actually lead to something." Eager to stay local, the Western New Yorker returned to UB, after attending Columbia University, for a more cost-efficient education.






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