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Tuesday, February 27, 2024
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Features

FEATURES

UB calls it 'quits'

Katie Johnson, a freshman occupational therapy major, had her first cigarette at the age of 13. She started smoking cigarettes regularly when she was a freshman in high school, and it has been about a month since she quit. "[Smoking] is a temporary stress reliever, but I've found other methods to relieve stress in a healthier way," Johnson said.


FEATURES

"Not just a gamer, but an artist"

While sitting in the peaceful atrium in UB's Center For the Arts, few would expect to hear casual chatter about drag queens and fake mothers - especially from the mild-mannered Sean Feiner. Feiner is a teaching assistant who co-teaches Gaming, Gender and Society in UB's Department of Media Study (DMS). The class focuses on social implications behind common video games and gender roles within them.


FEATURES

UB ROTC students form SA club

They wake up by daybreak - sometimes as early as 3 or 4 a.m. - arrive on site before the average college student wakes up, train physically and mentally for hours and still make it to their first classes. UB ROTC (Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps) cadets dedicate time, strength and discipline into their committed roles.


Steven Kahn, a sophomore chemistry major, with one of his campers at the summer camp where he works in Rhode Island. Though Kahn feels fortunate to have a summer job, he wishes he was able to secure an internship in his desired professional field.
FEATURES

UB students fight teenage 'Great Depression'

Andrew Sum, director of the Center for Labor Market Studies at Northeastern University in Boston, calls a recent decline in employment of 16- to 19-year-olds a "Great Depression for teens." He said the percentage of teens out of work in the summer has "never been this low in our lives."


FEATURES

"Student pays $2,000 for others to do his schoolwork "

Gilbert Hammerman* paid his way through college. Not in the sense that he paid his own tuition or took out loans to receive his college degree. He paid his classmates and friends to write his papers, take his online courses and complete his projects. Hammerman spent $2,000 during his junior and senior years to graduate.


FEATURES

UB remembers 9/11

It's been 12 years since the planes fell out of the sky on that September day. Do you remember where you were on 9/11? Rolando Rabut, a sophomore architecture major, was in math class.


Charity Miles, a free app available to iPhone and Android users, creates incentive to exercise by offering users an opportunity to give back to the community through charitable donations by using the app's GPS capability to track their mileage while running, walking or biking.
FEATURES

Changing the world one mile at a time

Running two and a half miles can give five meals to hungry people. Running 3.2 miles can provide roughly eight puppy and kitten vaccinations. Charity Miles, a free app available to iPhone and Android users, creates incentive to exercise by offering users an opportunity to give back to the community through charitable donations.


FEATURES

Passing on the smiles

Mindy Weinman's life changed when she met David. The South American boy had just immigrated to Weinman's school in the United States and could barely speak English.


FEATURES

Getting dirty for a cause that's worthy

Madison Darling, a junior health and human services major, was covered in mud from head to toe and she loved every second of it. Approximately 10,000 females covered in pink and brown climbed, crawled and challenged themselves to complete the Dirty Girl Mud Run in support of cancer awareness in Buffalo suburb Lancaster on Saturday and Sunday. The participants organized in teams to take on various woman-themed obstacles at the non-competitive 5K race.


FEATURES

Makeup is my wig

She could not verbalize anything. Laying in a hospital bed, hooked up to tubes and needles, bone-thin from not eating for five days, makeup blogger Talia Castellano held onto Lizzy Lenchner's hand. She opened her eyes for a few moments, looked at Lenchner and smirked.


FEATURES

Beyond UB's borders

One reason to try winter session? "Dare yourself to an intellectual challenge - an adventure," said Debra Street, professor and chair of the sociology department. UB added an extra week to its winter break, extending it to Jan.


FEATURES

Growing sustainability

Four students are embracing UB's push to be more sustainable. And, according to them, it all starts with a garden. In June, Jonathan Gibbons, Kristen Janson, Margaret Murray and Dylan Steed attended the


FEATURES

Talking dead

If a zombie apocalypse hits Buffalo anytime soon, one group of UB students will be prepared to handle the impending chaos. These students meet every Tuesday around a large seminar table in Capen Hall and are instructed by John Edgar Browning, an adjunct English professor and Ph.D.


FEATURES

Jewish students find a second home at the Chabad House

Every Friday night, Rivka Gurary serves a $1,000 meal to her family. She spends two to three days preparing dishes of chicken, soup, challah, gefilte fish, rice, salads and desserts - from scratch. The meal is not only for her immediate family - her husband, Rabbi Moshe Gurary and their five children - but also the entire Jewish community at UB. The Chabad House, located at 2450 North Forest Road behind Wilkeson Quadrangle, is a home away from home to over 100 UB students and thousands of UB alumni, according to Rabbi Gurary.


FEATURES

UB nightlife takes a turn

What used to be one of the most popular bars by South Campus has become the home of the calzone king. A neon blue sign and long line of drunken freshmen can no longer be spotted outside of 3160 Main St.





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