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Tuesday, October 19, 2021
The independent student publication of The Unversity at Buffalo, since 1950

Arts

ARTS

Falloween Playlist

 As temperatures cool and leaves change color, our upbeat summer playlists “fall” out of fashion. Whether you’re going for a trek through a haunted maze, crafting the perfect Halloween costume or digging into your favorite pumpkin-flavored treat, The Spectrum has crafted a fall playlist sure to leave you with more chills than the “Goosebumps” series ever could.


Sophomore dance major Kelsey Wegman practices her craft alone in her own studio.
ARTS

Dance students find unique ways to practice their craft in quarantine

Kelsey Wegman used to never want to share the stage. Like most dancers, she dreamed of big, dramatic solo numbers, dancing center stage, spotlight following her every move. But now the sophomore dance major wants nothing more than to pirouette next to her peers. Her private studio space is lonely, and watching her friends dance from hundreds of miles away during Zoom classes just isn’t the same.Dance students find unique ways to practice their craft in quarantine


Indie pop band Cooler performs live at Nietzsche's in Buffalo's Allentown district.
ARTS

The show must go on, but not during the pandemic

From SXSW to Justin Bieber’s “Changes” tour, the COVID-19 pandemic has caused the postponement and cancelation of music performances across the world. While many fans are coping with FOMO and hundred-dollar ticket losses, local musicians, promoters, labels and small venues –– the backbone of Buffalo’s music community –– have stopped their operations entirely. Without a realistic date in place for a return to normalcy, members of the Buffalo music community are adapting to stay relevant, productive and in business. They can’t do what they love right now, and in some cases, they’re up against a financially uncertain future.


DJ Rozwell’s artist photo on Bandcamp.
ARTS

Peering through the veil of wizardry and mystery: A conversation with DJ Rozwell

With muffled samples of paranormal television, lo-fi hip-hop beats and the occasional 16-bit synthesizer comprising his signature sound, no one sounds quite like DJ Rozwell. The West Virginia hip-hop producer gained notoriety in 2014 with “None of This is Real,” a mix meant for playing on shuffle with a five-six second crossfade to replicate the randomized elements of old ‘80s text-based and rogue-like role-playing games.






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