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UB students' favorite songs to put you in 'the mood'

sexyplaylist

Music is a passionate art, fueled by the emotions of the artists who wrote each song. This week’s Spectrum playlist is aimed toward spicing up your love life by helping you get “in the mood.”

Zayn and Taylor Swift – “I Don’t Wanna Live Forever”

This song has it all. The passionate falsetto of a former One Direction singer, seductive lyrics and the simplistic familiarity in Taylor Swift’s voice all come together beautifully. Together, the two singers’ voices fit like a glove on a hand. After the success of the first film’s soundtrack, listeners of the Fifty Shades Darker soundtrack should not be disappointed. “It’s slow enough where it’s passionate, but upbeat where it’s not boring,” said Lauren Gasparini, a senior psychology major who requested this song.

Chance the Rapper – “Juke Jam”

If you’re looking for a slow, sexy and reminiscent song, you’ve found it right here. Chance sings about a trip to the rink with a love interest.

The steady beat makes the song feel just the right amount of sexy. With Towkio and Justin Bieber crooning along, “Juke Jam” can make any moment a special moment. Kelsey Marano, a senior psychology major, recommended this song.

The Weeknd – “Often”

When it comes to songs with sexual undertones, or blatantly obvious sexual meaning, The Weeknd is today’s love doctor. “Often” is a solid combination of Abel’s beautiful vocals and catchy percussion. “The Weeknd has a really good voice and RnB overall is just a really good genre,” Marano said.

Trey Songz – “Slow Motion”

The man behind “Neighbors Know My Name” and “I Invented Sex” still has it. Trey’s vocal riffs fit perfectly on the song’s simple beat, as it picks up with hand clapping. When the chorus approaches, the song drops and matches the whole “slow motion” concept of the lyrics.

“Trey Songz is super attractive and has a very sexy voice,” said Emma Skreppen, a sophomore psychology major. These attributes certainly contribute to the appeal of “Slow Motion.”

Jeremih – “Birthday Sex”

As a kid, I always found Jeremih’s hit catchy, but was too embarrassed to admit how much I liked it. This song still holds up in 2017, with its slow percussion and soulful singing and it isn’t long before it’s considered an RnB classic.

Skreppen also recommended Jeremih’s repetitive tune.

Usher – “Burn”

Usher’s Confessions record was full of sexy music, so this addition is no surprise. Usher’s vocal range and riffs should be the sole reason behind the song’s sexy appeal, but the instrumentation is also a huge help.

Grad student Caroline Cuyler in the MSW Program agrees. “My boyfriend sings it and sounds really good with it,” she said.

Kelly Rowland ft. Lil Wayne – “Motivation”

Rowland’s track with Wayne is nothing short of sexy. Rowland sings of her being sexual motivation to her partner and Weezy’s verse is a response to that. Wayne’s depiction of “doing the dishes” is more than enough to entice a listener to try the song. Jillian Naylor, a senior biological sciences major, recommended this song.

Mavado – “When You Feel Lonely”

Naylor also recommended this track. It’s incredibly smooth, from the Jamaican singer’s vocals to the enjoyable percussion in the chorus. “It’s just one of those songs that put you in the mood,” Naylor said.

The Weeknd – “The Morning”

Abel’s numerous contributions to this playlist should come as no surprise. This song is full of synth-like verses which lead up to a catchy chorus where Abel repeats “girl put in work” alongside infectious drums.

This is a great taste of his earlier stuff. “The Morning” was recommended by Juliette Martinez, a sophomore health and human sciences major.

The Weeknd – “Die for You”

Starboy is a significantly different album than Abel’s previous work, so this song is not very similar to his other cuts off this playlist. It’s more of a hard-hitting pop song, with a pulsating beat and memorable melody. Nevertheless, “Die for You” is a sexy and enjoyable pop song. This song was recommended by Elvis Li, a sophomore undecided major.

Ariana Grande ft. Nicki Minaj – “Side to Side”

In my opinion, Ariana Grande is one of the best (if not the best) female vocalists in modern pop music. With that being said, her track with Nicki Minaj is a sexy, upbeat, pop song with one of the catchiest melodies right now. Its not-so-hidden meaning and risqué music video further prove its worth on this playlist. “Side to Side” was recommended by graduate student Supriya Patil.

Tata Young – “Sexy Naughty Bitchy Me”

This track is legitimately about being “sexy.” The Thai-American pop star sings about being the three things listed in the title and not wanting to change the way she is. This fun pop song was recommended by graduate student Medha Parashar.

J Cole – “Wet Dreamz”

The visual depiction of J Cole’s young love is one of the better cuts of 2014 Forest Hills Drive. Cole’s story about losing his virginity and the twist at the end, are what his fans love most about his music - the storytelling aspect. This song was recommended by Jordan Ince, a freshman business major.

Boyz II Men – “End of the Road”

This '90s classics is the first song I think of when I think of sexy music. Although “I’ll Make Love to You” would have been the obvious choice, there are many things about this one that I find more appealing.

Not only is the song about winning your girl back, but the song’s instrumentation, harmonies and Michael McCary’s talking point at the end make for one of the most beautiful and soulful songs of all time. This addition to the playlist is my own personal recommendation.

Mariah Carey – “Underneath the Stars”

Although this was never a single off Mariah’s Daydream album, it’s still one of my favorites. Mariah’s angelic voice and the song’s piano riffs add to the song’s delicate and passionate feel. “Underneath the Stars” is a truly hidden gem in Carey’s fifth studio album. This recommendation comes straight from my own personal music preferences.

Brenton J. Blanchet is an arts staff writer and can be reached at arts@ubspectrum.com


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