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Winter fashion do's and don’ts

Preparing you for the rough Buff weather to come


/ The Spectrum The Spectrum

This upcoming December will mark my third, highly unanticipated winter in Buffalo. For the freshmen reading this, winter in Buffalo really starts firing its warning shots in late November.

Cold weather can force many of us to fall into that routine cycle of sweatpants and old coats from high school. I promise you, it’s really not against the law to look halfway decent in the winter – although many people seem to think otherwise.

I’ve compiled a few yays and nays regarding fashion trends for the winter that will hopefully help to weed out everyone’s closet in need.

I guess we can start off with one of my annual favorites: the salt-stained Uggs.

Now before fans of Starbucks and Uggs start jumping down my throat, I do realize that salt has to be put on the grounds in efforts to melt the snow. However, I have a high school friend whose father cleaned the salt stains right off of her Uggs. If he can do it, so can UB students.

On the topic of Uggs being problematic, I want to take a brief minute and mourn the loss of male Ugg boots, as I put them to rest.

It’s really sad a lot of men think that the lace-up Ugg boots are actually trendy because they’re actually ruining your outfit – they’re just a big no.

Now, let me set my mean streak aside and talk about what I love seeing: black on black.

Black is one of those colors that you can never go wrong with, especially in the winter. Long black coats and garments with fitted black trousers are always a must during winter. Top your outfits off with a simple black boot or high-top black sneaker and you’ll be all set.

The mean streak is back: Lock away all of your white clothing. Ah, the ever-so-confused individuals who think it’s OK to be wearing all white in winter. Are you a snow angel? No. Stop it.

Wearing a lot of white in the winter is the equivalent of wearing overalls to a funeral. White looks amazing when the weather is nice and compliant, but in the winter it clashes entirely too much with the snow.

The winter is already white enough.

Another winter essential that I obviously can’t go without discussing is coats.

Allow me to elaborate on how to completely ruin or elevate a look depending on the coat that you wear.

I can’t stress enough that for men and women, long coats are in - long peacoats and long parkas.

But there is a technicality for this point. Men, do not wear the Sherlock Holmes-style beige coats. You’re not searching for any clues on campus – you’re eating at Pistachios.

Long parkas are awesome but waist-length parkas are childish. Maybe in sixth grade when we all were impressionable and sad were they acceptable, but now it’s just a disgrace to the United States.

To end the coat rant I will say that waist-length bomber jackets are always a simple way to play it safe if you want to wear a short coat.

Now this next fashion no-no is actually UB specific – meaning I’ve seen this trend, or should I say epidemic, heavily spread around campus: the good ol’ Timberlands with shorts monstrosity.

It’s 20 degrees out so you say, Hey, let me walk to the Student Union in boots and shorts?

It’s like trying to make a dog mate with a sea lion – no correlation, at all.

Now onto our make-or-break article of clothing – pants.

Joggers, skinnies, cuffed, ripped, baggy at the top tailored at the bottom – all are totally acceptable.

Bootcut, flare or salt-stained yoga pants – access denied. Unacceptable.

Ladies, don’t be scared to stray away from the combat boot and leggings with legwarmer socks combo

Guys – Sperry boat shoes weren’t made for winter weather.

Everyone could use more hats in their wardrobe because hats are one of those things that perfect an outfit. Spice it up with some fashion glasses every now and then so people see your eyes differently.

Enjoy Buffalo’s decent weather while it’s still here but play by the rules of fashion for the winter to come.

Ty Adams is a features staff writer. Features desk can be reached at features@ubspectrum.com.


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