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Let’s chill with the 'Netflix and Chill'

Debating the ‘social phenomenon’ of watching TV with someone else


The Spectrum

The Internet, and by extension social media, links humanity together like never before. It has gone beyond sharing information and ideas into a shared, online consciousness thanks to memes and other ideas that were born on social networks.

One of the most recent social phenomena is “Netflix and Chill,” a way for men to ask girls out without actually asking girls out.

Instead of saying, “Hey, let’s get dinner and maybe go see a movie,” men can cover their bases by saying, “Hey, I kind of want to stay in tonight. I have Netflix, we should just chill and watch a movie.”

This practice is used mainly for two reasons.

First – to dampen the blow of rejection. If I never really asked you out, I never really got rejected.

Secondly, and most popularly, it’s an easier way to get someone to have sex with you. Watching a movie leads to cuddling, cuddling leads to kissing and then, well, you get the idea.

You just got for free in one night what men of decades past had to spend a bunch of time and money to get – congratulations.

At this point, you’re probably thinking, “Wow, this guy is a dog.”

And I don’t blame you. But I will say that I personally feel that “Netflix and Chill” should be done in moderation and only under certain circumstances.

Most men at this age do think that this practice is just an easy way to get what they really want. That’s why I think things need to change quickly before modern courting practices devolve into nothing more than making sure you have clean sheets and an Internet connection.

Have no fear – this can work. Relationships are all about compromise.

First, the fellas – you guys are way too trigger happy with the whole “Netflix and Chill” thing and it’s making us all look bad. It needs to be done in moderation before we lose it forever.

Do you know how frustrating it is when it’s a cold Buffalo night and all you want to do is cuddle up and watch a movie with someone and you get hit with a “Who do you think I am” text, a “You’re not going to ‘Netflix and Chill’ me!” text?

Fellas, taking a girl out isn’t hard. Even if you aren’t head over heels about her, you should still learn how to date correctly before you graduate, enter the real world and realize that borrowing your older brother’s Netflix account and weeding through the children’s movies that your niece likes to find a scary movie won’t work forever.

I know we’re all broke college students but you can go on a great date for less than $30 if you know what you’re doing. Don’t think you need to break the bank to impress someone. If you’re on a date, the person should be there to enjoy your company, not to be wowed by how much money you can spend at Olive Garden.

It was never that serious. And on the off chance that she is there for how much money is being spent, drop her faster than that class where you got a 30 percent on the midterm.

Now for the ladies.

First, demand more. If this were a year ago, I wouldn’t blame you for falling for the “Netflix and Chill” routine – but now the blame is just as much on you as it is on men.

I’m telling you without an ounce of doubt that men wouldn’t pull the “Netflix and Chill” card if it didn’t work so often. Think about it – if a strategy doesn’t work, it gets changed.

Suggest going out somewhere.

If that guy really does want your company he’ll have no problem taking you somewhere, even if he doesn’t have his own transportation.

The Stampede, NFTA bus and the metro rail run just fine – he’ll be all right.

Some women may want to “Netflix and Chill” for the same reason guys do – and that’s fine. Just don’t let irrational gender roles and dating standards get in the way of what you want. Know what you’re getting into.

There’s nothing wrong with “Netflix and Chill” if that’s what both of you want and it’s been communicated.

James Battle is a contributing arts writer. Arts desk can be reached at arts@ubspectrum.com.


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