Video: Heard around campus

The Spectrum breaks down what students are listening to

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The Spectrum

With midterm season upon us, you may not have the time to explore what’s new in the music scene. Just playing one of Spotify’s “cram like there’s no

tomorrow” playlists may seem like the easy way out. Instead, try listening to this playlist compiled from what students are currently listening to.

“Hope” – We Came As Romans

The metal-core band keeps true to its sound with this newer track off its latest album, “Tracing Back Roots.” The song has quiet beginnings until the lead singer starts. His voice resonates above the piano and guitar combination. Once the first verse sets in, the drums hit a hard and steady beat for the song to follow. The chorus matches the song’s title of hope, crying “We won’t fall to our knees / we are the one true hope, so give me an answer.”

“Young Thug” – Danny Glover

The rapper, not exactly known for his literacy, spits quick, catchy rhymes over slow beats. He varies in style, varying his speed from fast to slow within his verses to display his ability to stay with the beat. He keeps his chorus slow, so you can actually understand what he’s saying. As a whole, the song has a sound similar to some of his other popular tracks, “Stoner” and “Hookah.”

“In Between” – Beartooth

The up-and-coming hard-core punk band started by the lead singer of Attack! Attack! hits hard with this song off their new album, “Disgusting.” The heavy guitar rips through the opening verses, allowing the excitement to build to an explosive chorus. Frontman Caleb Shomo sings “Everybody gets high / everybody gets low / life can be such overdose.”

“Wicked Games” – The Weekend

The hit song off the album “Trilogy,” displays lead singer Abel Tesfaye’s ability to manipulate his voice to create harmonies that blend with each other. The song starts in slowly, as Tesfaye croons until he reaches his chorus. The melody features backup vocals also sung by him that are transposed over his hook. He produces his own beats, so the entire song is a presentation of his work and ability to be a solo artist that provides for himself.

“Clint Eastwood” – Gorillaz

You probably haven’t heard much from this band since “Feel Good Inc.,” but they kill it with this track off their 2001 self-titled album, “Gorillaz.” Their dark persona is wrapped around their trance-like chorus and speckled throughout the fixed pace of their verses, sounding like a slow rap. Their lyrics also reflect their persona: “You think it’s fictional / Mystical? Maybe / Spiritual, hearable / What appears in you is a clearer view ‘cause you’re crazy.”

“Do I Wanna Know?” – Arctic Monkeys

The slow, melting melody of this track is hypnotizing. The alternative band keeps listeners at attention with their heavy bass, combined with the lead singer’s voice, which has a higher pitch to it. Their relatable lyrics speak to fans, as the singer croons “Do you ever get that fear that you can’t shift the tide / that sticks around like something’s in your teeth.”

“Stay With Me” – Sam Smith

The anthem is still ringing through the ears of UB students as they aim to hold onto pieces of summer fun. Smith’s gentle tune not only demonstrates his vocal range, but also has a catchy chorus anyone could sing along to as they cruise around town in the sunshine. His quiet verses compliment his impactful chorus, creating a balance between belting and whispering.

“Feel At Home” – Fly Union

The hip-hop group slows it down with their track that talks about developing feelings for a new girl how to make her feel comfortable and safe. The bongos in the background pick up the song and make it more upbeat in the chorus as rapper Jerreau speaks more than sings, “Now turn this club into my living room/These couches, drinks, make these women feel at home.”

“Bleed It Out” – Linkin Park

The Linkin Park classic is still part of playlists everywhere with their punk rock, grunge sound. The single off the 2007 album “Minutes to Midnight” keeps a steady pace; spitting verses out like a rapper until the chorus comes in screaming. Electric guitar riffs are speckled throughout, harmonizing with the lyrics as they push the song forward. For any Linkin Park fan, this song is just another testament to their ability to be a heavy rock band with the agility of a rapper.

“Lose Yourself” – Eminem

The definitive hit from the ‘Rap God’ was the first single released off the soundtrack for 8 Mile and has continued to be the anthem for underdog rappers everywhere. The popularity of the song might come from the way Marshall Mathers keeps his rhymes clean and cut, displaying his style of rapping. It also might be the lyrics that make the song so poignant, encouraging listeners to take advantage the opportunities they get: “You’ve only got one shot / Do not miss this chance to blow / This opportunity comes once in a lifetime / You better lose yourself.”

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email: arts@ubspectrum.com